HONORARIA

The Bay Treasure Chest Association offers a $500 honorarium to not-for-profit organizations and groups that offer a service to the community at large, and can provide four volunteers to assist with one weekly count. Read our guidelines to see if you think your organization qualifies; then complete an application form and forward to honorarium@baytreasurechest.ca

Guidelines:

  • Local organizations must serve the community within the St. Margaret’s Bay catchment area.
  • More than one application per year may be considered from a single applicant.
  • Once an application has been accepted and a date agreed upon, four volunteers (aged 16 and over) must be available on a Wednesday afternoon from 1-4 p.m.
  • The BTCA committee will respond to applications within 90 days of receiving them.
  • The BTCA has sole discretion when selecting the organization/group for the honorarium.
  • The BTCA reserves the right to use your organization in print publications, online, website, social media and other forms of communications deemed appropriate by the Board.

Restrictions:

Bay Treasure Chest Association will not consider funding:

  • Individual medical issues, sponsorship or crisis;
  • School trip activities and fundraising;
  • Sports teams/tournaments;
  • A government operated, public sector organization/institution (i.e. schools, primary healthcare facilities);
  • A religious/spiritual entity; or,
  • Groups already directly benefiting from BTCA funds.

Honorarium Recipients

August 8: 250 Vimy Air Cadets

Local youth aged 12 to 18 participate in a variety of fun, challenging and rewarding activities, learning about teamwork, leadership and citizenship. “There’s lots of opportunity to grow in a structured environment,” says Derek Strong, chair of the parents’ committee.

There’s a weekly training schedule with a focus on aeronautics and basic survival skills; activities include squadron drill, band and biathlon teams that compete yearly. The youth “are also a huge help in the community volunteering throughout the year with various organizations,” says Derek.

“The money raised from fundraising efforts help cover costs of facility rentals such as Canada Games Center for swimming, and other physical activities, and upgrading and maintaining band equipment.”

August 1: Hubbards Community Waterfront Assoc

A canopy of stars, a backdrop of ocean … and your blanket, the best seat in the house!” So says Jonathan Meakin, a volunteer with Hubbards Community Waterfront Assoc, referring to the Hubbards Waterfront Movies series, this week’s honorarium recipient.

All screenings are free, although donations are welcome — as are kids and dogs. You can buy drinks and treats onsite.

There are only two movies remaining this season: Princess Bride, On Aug. 17 (start time is 8:30) and Moana, on Aug 31 (start time 8pm); held at the amphiteatre at Hubbards Community Waterfront Park. “Typically 60 to 90 people show up,” says Jonathan. “Just come on down say 10 or 15 minutes beforehand.”

For more info: @HubbardsFilm on Twitter and Facebook; hubbardswaterfrontmovies on Instagram.

July 25: SMB Lions Club

Shown here are breakfast program volunteers Joanne and Rita along with student volunteers Tessa, Meghan and Chelsea, accepting a cheque for $500 from SMB Lion Michael this past March.

St. Margaret’s Bay Lions Club was our honorarium group this afternoon, providing four volunteers to help at the count –today a total of 9,880 toonies– in return for $500. In truth, the SMB Lions have helped a few times throughout the years. Where do the BTC funds generated go?

Here are some highlights:

*Food vouchers for families in need, as well as eye exams and glasses; free medical equipment such as walkers, crutches, hospital beds and wheelchairs on loan.

*Four $500 bursaries to Sir John A. High School graduates last month: Connor Joel Blaikie, Dominic Allen Dorey, Daniel Jacob Long and Christopher Milburn.

*The Beechville-Lakeside-Timberlea Junior and Senior Elementary School Breakfast Club, helping provide healthy breakfasts for elementary students from Primary to Grade 5 every Tuesday and Thursday during the school year. Approximately 200-250 students regularly attend the breakfasts.


“The St. Margaret’s Bay Lions Club has provided young and old alike financialassistance with proceeds received from BTC Honorarium Program,” says Lion Peter.

Thank you to players and volunteers for helping this happen!

Lydia Boutilier, Margot Fraser, Barbara Way and Margaret 
De Carvalho: SMB Lion volunteers today at the count.

July 18: SMB Association for Community Living

For Linda Swim, fundraising for St. Margaret’s Bay & Area Association for Community Living — this week’s honorarium recipient — is personal. She started the group in 1987, she says, because there were no community programs in the Bay area for her daughter, Debbie, and other people who were mentally challenged or developmentally delayed. “Debbie left school at 21,” says Linda. “And then what?”

The association offers two programs per week: Tuesday morning there’s life skills training at St. Luke’s Church; on Thursday morning there’s an exercise class, crafts or games and lunch in the community room at Superstore. In summer there are outings.

Anyone can be a member for $5/year. If you pay an additional $20/year you can participate in the programs. Currently four or five people attend the Tuesday program; the Thurs group also includes six students from Sir John A. Ages range from 15 to 75.

“Some have autism or epilepsy; some are more high functioning than others,” notes Linda, who is the St. Margaret’s Bay Branch Director for Nova Scotia Association for Community Living, a province-wide, not-for-profit association of people with intellectual disabilities, families, and others. (When asked if she has a background in social work her quick response is, “No. I am a mother.)

“We pay for the instructors but everyone else is a volunteer. Otherwise the money goes towards room rentals, insurance, program supplies, things like that. We don’t qualify for a lot of funding because we don’t actually have a building,” Linda says.

“Our annual budget is $22,000; each program runs about $10,000. We have one fundraiser per year where we make about $13,000 in personal fundraising and corporate donations.

Debbie, now 55, likes the social aspects of the programs; interacting with others, says Linda. “And still, as far as I know, there’s no one else doing what we’re doing in the Bay.”

“I didn’t want Debbie to go to Bedford or Sackville or Halifax. I wanted her to stay in our community. I still do.”

Shown above from left: Audrey Doucette, Nancy Gilbert and Darrell Blakney. Not shown: Rene Staples

July 11: Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Halifax

Big Brothers will spend its $500 honorarium on summer excursions and events for the Big Bunch program, a school-based program that matches elementary school age students throughout the Bay area with high school students at Sir John A., under the guidance of adult mentors. Young students (“Littles”) gain valuable social interaction with friends, and the high school students (“Bigs”) learn leadership skills, experience working with kids, and the benefits of being a volunteer. “There’s a waiting list of littles,” says Nancy Webber of Big Brothers Big Sisters. As well, she notes, many times teens volunteer with a friend, so there’s a social aspect for them as well.

Hopefully coming in fall to the Bay area: an In-School mentoring program, taking place at the child’s school, during school hours. For one hour a week, a volunteer adult mentor meets with a youngster — at a time agreed upon by the volunteer and the school — engaging the individual in activities such as board games, crafts or physical activity.

For more information: halifax.bigbrothersbigsisters.ca

 

Photo: Kayleigh Amarandos, Nicolla Shortt and Robyn Murphy are Halifax university students that have placements with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Halifax, this day helping out BBBS Mentoring Coordinator Nancy Webber (seated) at the BTC toonie count.

July 4: Cove FM (Hubbards Radio Society)

Cove FM is a not for profit community radio station owned and operated by Hubbards Radio Society, serving the greater St Margarets Bay/Hubbards/Chester areas. Operated by volunteers, it offers a mixed-music format that includes East Coast and indie artists. Honorarium funds will go to help keep the lights on, says director Kristy Wagner.

From far left, clockwise: John Robia, Cathy Layton, Fred Layton and Kristy Wagner.

June 27: Hammonds Plains Historical Society

The Hammonds Plains Historical Society is a non profit group whose mandate is to preserve the history of the Hammonds Plains area. Through regular meetings the group offers presentations on local history to residents so they can learn about the area’s past. Honorarium funds will be used to purchase display boards set up in the community to highlight specific themes of historical significance, such as the barrel and box industry, the saw mills, schools, forresters hall, the phone company, plane crash of 1951 — and the Hammonds Plains Road itself.

From far left: Ted Misztela, Gail Stronach, Jeanne Campbell, Dave Haverstock.

June 20: Halifax Regional Search and Rescue

Founded in 1972, HSAR is a community-based volunteer organization dedicated to saving lives. The group has a mandate to locate and rescue lost persons; it also conducts wilderness survival and education sessions for adults and children (see Hug-A-Tree, below), evidence searches with local police, and evacuations and other emergency responses in cooperation with the Emergency Measures Organization.
 
With more than 150 volunteers, which includes 15 members in the Bay area, the rescue group serves all HRM. In May, team members responded with the RCMP, Halifax Fire and Emergency Service and Emergency Health Services to rescue an injured hiker on the Bluff Wilderness Hiking Trail in Timberlea; the subject was transported from the location via HSAR’s boat.
Honorarium funds will be used for equipment, training and other resources. HSAR has a few fundraisers throughout the year, including boot drives, the annual Haunted Hollow on Hammonds Plains, and an Eco-Endurance challenge.
Find out more about HSAR here.

Shown in above photo: Chris Richards, PJ Baker, Ralph MacLean and Cheryl Ratushny. #WeServeAsOne

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Halifax Regional Search & Rescue delivers the Hug-a-Tree program to help children survive if they are lost in the woods. Presentations are primarily aimed at children aged five to 12; demonstrations/games/videos are used to teach participants how not to become lost in the woods. If you do become lost? Hug a tree, staying put, and help searchers find you by answering their calls. Plus: how to keep warm and dry in the woods.

More than 1,000 children take the program annually through elementary schools and groups such as Scouts and Guides. Email hugatree@halifaxsar.ca to find out about registering your group.

June 6: Tantallon Village Farmers’ Market

BTC honorarium funds will help offset the costs of signage, and two tents, says market manager Jeani Mustain. “The market uses tents for local non-profit organizations, for music, and to rent out to vendors who do not have their own tent. We also buy tables, umbrellas and chairs for people to sit on at the market — to eat and rest.”

With more than 40 vendors this year, the outdoor market runs every Tuesday, 2-6pm, from June 12 to October 16. Location: the intersection of Peggy’s Cove Road and St. Margaret’s Bay Road.

The market originated as a project of Transition Bay St. Margarets.

Tantallon Village Farmers’ Market honorarium counters, from left: Cam Farnell, Jason Ranger and Shelley Glover. (Not shown: Andrea Farnell.)

 

May 30: Animal Rescue Coalitions Nova Scotia

ARC rescues abandoned, stray and abused animals, with its main focus being St. Margaret’s Bay. BTC honorarium funds will be used on veterinary assessments and treatments for animals in the group’s care, such as spaying/neutering, vaccinations, deworming. There is no shelter; instead animals are looked after by volunteers in their homes until a forever family can be found. ARC provides the foster family with food and essentials for the animals in care.

Shown far left is Barkley, who was abandoned when his owners moved. He was found in an apartment building and surrendered to ARC, which provided much needed vetting (his teeth were rotten, for example). He was fostered by the Herritts of Hubbards, who named him Barkley, due to his love of barking. The pup was adopted by Lois and Ray, also shown here, whom, it is said, love him to bits. Find out more about ARC here.

ARC honorarium counters, front row from left: Joan Sinden, Audrey Kennedy, Joe Comeau. Back: Annette Armitage, Tracy Jessiman

 

May 23: Anglican Parish of French Village Mothers’ Union

Working with members of St. Luke’s United Church, Upper Tantallon, Mothers’ Union provides a day program once a month for the women of the Marguerite Centre — a transition home for women recovering from addictions — in Timberlea. Find more information about the Marguerite Centre on its website: themargueritecentre.com.

From far left: Janet Champniss, Debbie Boutilier, Helga Guderley, Linda Hills.

 

May 9: St. Margaret Sailing Club Junior Sail

SMSC’s Jr Sail program provides sailing lessons to more than 100 children during July and August each summer, allowing kids the opportunity to develop life-long skills, great friendships and an appreciation of nature. Funds are used to replace the wind-blown sails for the boats used.

From far left: Ray Mattholie, Matthew Hilchie, Meg Harris and Connor Snarr. Connor is an instructor in the Jr Sail program.

 

May 2: Through the Years Daycare Centre

Funds will be used to purchase art supplies for the classroom.
Shown left, clockwise from top left: Gladys Shatford, Carol Coolen, Carolyn Shatford and Mary Ellen Shatford.

 

 

 

 

April 25: SMB Food Bank

St. Margaret’s Bay Food Bank is one in a network of 146 food banks, soup kitchens, shelters and meal programs throughout Nova Scotia supported in part by Feed Nova Scotia. Families and individuals can pick up food there once a month; the location is 13495 Peggy’s Cove Rd.

Several food drives are held throughout the year, including an annual road toll at Sobeys and Superstore; various churches, schools, clubs, businesses and organizations — such as the Haliburton Hills and Westwood Hills Subdivision homeowners associations — have drives for the Food Bank as well.

SMB Food Bank also operates a Thrift Store at the same location, selling used clothing and household items; approximately 23 volunteers from the area help run both operations.

People who access a food bank come from all backgrounds and have any number of reasons for needing support, such as divorce, disabilities, mental health struggles and domestic violence, as well as unemployment and inadequate income.

For more information about SMB Food Bank, check out its website, or visit in person at 13495 Peggy’s Cove Rd. from Tuesday to Saturday, 11am – 4pm. 

April 18: Big Brothers Big Sisters

Shown left: Robyn Murphy, Nancy Webber, Emma Hayes and Bernadette Fegan.

 

 

 

 

April 11: Cove FM 

Cove FM is a not for profit community radio station owned and operated by Hubbards Radio Society, serving the greater St. Margaret’s Bay/Hubbards/Chester areas. The signal reaches west to the outskirts of Bridgewater and east to the outskirts of Halifax, covering a population of approximately 50,000 people. Cove FM is operated by volunteers from the community, offering a mixed music format that includes pop, rock, country, folk, blues, jazz, bluegrass, East Coast, and many other genres by both well known performers and indie artists. “We plan to use the funds to assist with our upcoming annual Kitchen Party fundraiser, held May 25, at the Shore Club,” says Kristy Wagner. “There will be five bands, a silent auction, raffle… and free appetizers! Doors open at 7pm; cost is $20.

Shown above left: Fred Layton, Cathy Layton, Kristy Wagner and John Robia.

 

 

April 4: Hubbards and Area Business Association 

The $500 honorarium funds for this group are earmarked to expand the Community Gardens, on Aspotogan Heritage Trust Society property at the crossroads of Highways 3 and 329. “We grow fruit trees, blueberries and strawberries,” says Lori Dale. “Plus all the basic vegetables: potatoes, carrots, kale, radishes…” The list goes on. Among others, the kids at the daycare next door help to keep the plants in fine fettle and, along with the Hubbards and Area Food Bank, share in the spoils. Watch for free educational sessions on planting, picking and preserving.

Shown left: Pat Thomas, Ethel Marshall, Linda O’Toole and Lori Dale.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 28: Black Point & Area Community Centre 

Black Point and area will soon have its own community centre. “We’ve got the bank account, the chairs and tables, the committee, even the keys” says Maureen Moore, on the committee that’s reinventing the fire hall as Black Point & Area Community Centre, leasing it from HRM.

“HRM is not in the business of keeping halls as such,” says Maureen. “The space was just sitting there, unused. We didn’t care who opened it for the community to use… we just wanted it opened, especially in winter.”

Getting to this point has been a year-long process, involving Deputy Fire Chief Roy Hollett and Councillor Matt Whitman, as well as a few stops and starts. Still, Maureen is hopeful that it will be available for rentals before long, thinking along the lines of pickle ball, card games and pub nights–not to mention weddings.

Lots of “the originals” are involved, she adds. Her sister Janet Fryday-Dorey is the chair of the committee; their parents, Albert and Margery Fryday, volunteered for the Black Point Fire Department in its early days; another committee member is Ron McIsaac, and his niece Janene. Ron’s parents, Leo and Joyce, were also involved in the fire hall a generation ago.

“I live in Hubbards now,” says Maureen. “But, I was born and raised in Black Point.”

Shown above: Ethel Marshall, Janene McIsaac, Jayne Fryday and Colleen Johnson.

March 21: SMB & Area Association for Community Living

From far left: Kathy Bruce, Linda Swim, Audrey Doucette and Renee Staples.

 

 

 

March 14: Big Brothers Big Sisters

“Because it’s March Break I was hoping we’d get more of our young program participants to volunteer for the toonie count,” says Nancy Webber, mentoring coordinator at Big Brothers Big Sisters. “Then again, because it’s March Break they typically have other plans!” Still we were happy to have Ingrid Helmke join us. She is a volunteer in the Big Bunch program at Sir John A, whereby high school student mentors (grades 10-12), are matched with elementary age children (grades three to six). Her mom, Ellen Helmke, joined in the fun as well—Ellen owns Otis & Clementine’s Books and Coffee, one of the retailers that hosts a chest where you can play your toonie.

From far left: Bernadette Fegan, Nancy Webber, Ellen Helmke and Ingrid Helmke.

March 7: 328 SMB Sea Cadets

From far left: Moe Morash, Kim Boutilier, Holly Jean, Daphne DeMond-Rose.

 

 

 

 

February 28: SMB Food Bank

From far left: Roma Kennedy, Pat Lade, Shirley Conrad, Stephen Lade.

 

 

February 14: Transition Bay St Margarets

“We are building resiliency for a world that’s in transition,” says co-founder David Wimberly, shown third from left, opposite. “There’s climate change, an economy that’s artificially supported, energy challenges, food insecurity…. Transition Bay builds skills that make life more creative and satisfying now, and offer community resiliency for what’s potentially on the horizon.”

For example, says Wimberly, a master flute maker also trained as an ecologist, you might build a house that’s energy efficient, but you could also make it adaptive if, say, there’s no electricity for several days after a storm. “We offer what we call upskilling: presenting the basics of skills that people used to know, such as how to keep chickens, sharpen knives, cook a pot of beans, keep bees, maintain a bicycle.”

“At a community level, we’re re-localizing services and resources upon which to build a promising future together. The activities lower costs and make us feel secure in our homes… as opposed to staring at the Stock Market all the time.”

Transition Bay is part of a larger, worldwide network of transition groups, started in England in 2005; Wimberly says part of his group’s mandate is to foster interest in the movement beyond the Bay throughout Atlantic Canada. There are approximately 1,000 people on its email list, and events held at the library frequently reach a capacity of 100 people.

Bay Treasure Chest funds help support the group’s local activities, such as the Transition Bay Garden, located at the Crossroads – demonstrating home gardener techniques for food production in raised beds – which last year donated more than 650 pounds of vegetables to the SMB Food Bank.

For more information about Transition Bay St Margarets please visit transitionbay.ca

Shown above, from left: Sarah Morgan, Judy Keating, David Wimberly and Richard Learning

Upcoming events
March 18, 2:30-4:30 pm
The Climate Change Movement in Atlantic Canada
Tantallon Public Library, 3646 Hammonds Plains Road

April 15, 2:15-4:30 pm
Seedopolis: Everything you Need to Know About Seeds & Seed Libraries
Tantallon Public Library

May 5, 1-4 pm
Crossroads Educational Vegetable Garden – 2018 Spring Planting
St. Margarets Bay Crossroads, 5209 St. Margarets Bay Road

February 7: Peggy’s Cove Area Festival of the Arts

Since its launch in 2011, the Peggy’s Cove Area Festival of the Arts has grown from a dream into a full-fledged coastal celebration of local artistic talent; its main focus is St. Margaret’s Bay with its iconic Peggy’s Cove Lighthouse, but it also includes other bays, harbours and coves such as Prospect Bay, Shad Bay, Head Harbour, Hubbards Cove and Mahone Bay.

Festival 2018 opens on the evening of Wednesday, July 4th at Shining Waters Marina, featuring live music, refreshments, a silent auction of art and craft works, demonstrations by artists and artisans creating works in a variety of media, and a “Community Canvas,” created by attendees.

This year’s festival has two highlights: the Studio Tour (July 6-8), where more than 60 studio artists, galleries and art groups welcome visitors through their doors. This is a unique opportunity to meet and interact with painters, potters, sculptors, wood and glass workers and jewellery artists at work in their studios.

The final activity (July 14-16) is a three-day plein air painting event,with 35 artists participating, in the village of Peggy’s Cove. Artworks produced will be offered for sale in a large Mongolian yurt located a short walk from the lighthouse. There will also be demonstrations by local artisans and a children’s art tent, offering a variety of free creative activities.

For more information please visit peggyscoveareafestivalofthearts.com

Shown above, from left: Daphne Trenaman, Beth Mathews, Wendy Madore and Jerry Walsh

January 31, 2018: Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Halifax

A group of high school and elementary school youth from St. Margaret’s Bay area recently went into town to go skating at the Oval. “One of our programs is called Big Bunch, whereby high school student mentors (grades 10-12), are matched with elementary age children (grades three to six) on our waiting list throughout the school year,” says Nancy Webber, BBBS mentoring coordinator. “All activities are done as a group about once every two weeks, under the guidance of an adult mentor.

The program has been running for 21 years at Sir John A.

“The young ones learn how to interact socially, while the teenagers have the opportunity to interact with children — maybe that’s something they decide to do in a career — to learn leadership skills, and include that involvement on a university or scholarship application.”

There’s also a community-based program in St Margaret’s Bay, whereby youth apply to have a one-on-one mentor.

“We hope to have more in-school mentoring in the St. Margaret’s Bay area as well,” says Webber. “The hope is to grow that program — it’s quite active in the city — where a community-based or in-school mentor would go to the school and spend an hour a week, one to one, with a child in his or her school.

If you or you know of anyone who would like to be involved in a Big Brothers program, please contact Nancy Webber, 902-701-4841 or nancy.webber@bigbrothersbigsisters.ca

Shown above: Bernadette Fegan, Nancy Webber, Tammy Hodge and Carol Rowland

January, 24, 2018: SMB Girl Guides of Canada

Honorarium funds will be used towards the cost of running our district camp in June, says Girl Guides of Canada deputy district commissioner  Megan Boyko. “For example tent purchase, tent repairs, lifeguard fees.” This camp is attended by approximately 130 girls from the St. Margaret’s Bay area.

Left (l to r): Dolores Boutilier, Angie Kinley, Melissa Murray, Melanie Deviller

 

January, 17, 2018: St. Margaret’s Bay & Area Association for Community Living

For Linda Swim, fundraising for St. Margaret’s Bay & Area Association for Community Living — this week’s honorarium recipient — is personal. She started the group in 1987, she says, because there were no community programs in the Bay area for her daughter, Debbie, and other people who were mentally challenged or developmentally delayed. “Debbie left school at 21,” says Linda. “And then what?”

The association offers two programs per week: Tuesday morning there’s life skills training at St. Luke’s Church; on Thursday morning there’s an exercise class, crafts or games and lunch in the community room at Superstore. In summer there are outings.

Anyone can be a member for $5/year. If you pay an additional $20/year you can participate in the programs. Currently four or five people attend the Tuesday program; the Thurs group also includes six students from Sir John A. Ages range from 15 to 75.

“Some have autism or epilepsy; some are more high functioning than others,” notes Linda, who is the St. Margaret’s Bay Branch Director for Nova Scotia Association for Community Living, a province-wide, not-for-profit association of people with intellectual disabilities, families, and others. (When asked if she has a background in social work her quick response is, “No. I am a mother.)

“We pay for the instructors but everyone else is a volunteer. Otherwise the money goes towards room rentals, insurance, program supplies, things like that. We don’t qualify for a lot of funding because we don’t actually have a building,” Linda says.

“Our annual budget is $22,000; each program runs about $10,000. We have one fundraiser per year where we make about $13,000 in personal fundraising and corporate donations.

Debbie, now 55, likes the social aspects of the programs; interacting with others, says Linda. “And still, as far as I know, there’s no one else doing what we’re doing in the Bay.”

“I didn’t want Debbie to go to Bedford or Sackville or Halifax. I wanted her to stay in our community. I still do.”

For more information about St. Margaret’s Bay & Area Association for Community Living, please contact Linda Swim at 902-826-7328 or linjim@eastlink.ca.

Shown above, from left: Sue Channer, Linda Swim, Joyce Dagley, Renee Staples.

January, 10, 2018: Roots and Boots Forest School Society

We’ve got a beautiful backyard in which to play, says Kellie Allen — referring to Nova Scotia generally and the St. Margaret’s Bay area specifically. Based in Hubley, Kellie is co-founder of Roots and Boots Forest School Society, a not-for-profit group that offers outdoor seasonal recreation programs for children ages 3-12.
      “Forest schools are big in Denmark and the UK,” says Kellie, who has worked with children and youth for 20 years, and is now an accredited Forest School Practitioner. They’re popular in other parts of Canada and have recently taken a foothold in Nova Scotia, she adds, noting however that other youth groups have traditionally worked to foster connections with nature as well.
      Back to Roots and Boots: depending on age and interest, kids can sign up for an afternoon’s workshop or a week-long day camp; activities might include tree identification, exploring local flora and fauna, gardening… and just plain unstructured play outdoors, where you might get your hands dirty. Remember that?
      “It’s great to get kids engaged in nature for its own sake but also, as adults, these kids are more likely to be stewards of the environment,” says Kellie. “We need more green time, less screen time.”
      Today’s honorarium will help fund scholarships for Forest School camp. Find out more about Roots and Boots Forest School online.
      Shown above: Sally Trower, Bert Allen, Kellie Allen and Tara Sullivan.

December 27, 2017: EDA Parents Association

“Our mandate/objectives are to foster, promote and encourage good sportsmanship, social development, work ethic and volunteerism of youth through performing arts,” says Nina Reddick, association director. “We also want to provide a representative body that brings together diverse individuals interested in the development and pursuit of dance education and opportunities for youth.”

The $500 honorarium funds will be used towards the cost of providing workshop/performance opportunities for youth, adds Nina. The association is based in Timberlea.

Shown above (l to r): Rhonda Fancy, Lori Lunney and Nina Reddick. Missing from the photo is Sean McCarthy.

December 20, 2017: Schoolhouse Rug Hookers

The Schoolhouse Rug Hookers meet twice a month at the Bay Community Centre, from September to June.

The group had a significant drop in membership in 2016 following the passing of several of its core members, and the movement of others out of the Bay area. Through the efforts of new leadership and generous donations of both time and supplies by members, free introductory lessons (including materials) were started to attract new potential members, allowing beginners to try the craft before purchasing their own equipment.

This initiative has doubled the membership and at the same time created a storage issue, whereby three members were carrying the group supplies in very large totes back and forth to each meeting.

The $500 honorarium will allow for the purchase of a lockable storage cabinet so group materials can be kept on site, as well as the purchase of hooking equipment (e.g., hooks and hoops) for beginners to use.

Shown above (l to r): Patsy Gorveatte, Celia Charlton, Judy Sadler, Lorna Ash.

November 29, 2017: SMB Lions Club

Shown left (l to r): Lydia Boutilier, Reg Sollows, Margot Fraser.
Not shown is Richard Feetham, who wanted to keep counting
toonies when the photo was taken.

 

 

 

November 22, 2017: Christmas in the Bay

A few of the volunteers at today’s toonie count! Shown in front to the left of the draw bin is Fran Dunn, organizer of the SMB community event Christmas in the Bay, running Sunday November 26–this week’s honorarium recipient. “This is our 12th year,” says the president of St. Margaret’s Bay Chamber of Commerce and owner of Breathe Yoga & Aromatherapy, Tantallon. “Our purpose is to give back to the community; to say thank you to folks for supporting us.”

 

November 15, 2017: St Margaret’s Bay Gardening Club

 “The $500 will be put to good use,” says SMBG Club volunteer Heather Wood. “Gardeners are very frugal!” Some of the activities members take on are plant sales, garden tours and workshops, as well as maintaining the gardens both at Upper Tantallon Crossroads and at Hubbards Barn, for all to enjoy. The group is always looking for new members, notes Heather.

Left (from l to r): Dianne Giffin-Boudreau,
Gerry Thibeau, 
Heather Wood, Carole Ross.

November 8, 2017: Animal Rescue Coalition

Funds will pay for treatments that some of the rescued animals require, such as recent surgeries to fix the cleft palates of two puppies who would otherwise have been euthanized.

Left (from l to r): Charlotte Edwards, Kelly
Mattinson, Jennifer Schofield, Amanda Lutz.

 

November 1, 2017: SMB Food Bank

Left (from l to r): Roma Kennedy, Juanita Stevens,
Louise Sullivan, Glenn Stevens.

 

 

 

October 25, 2017: SMB & Area Association for Community Living

Left (from l to r): Nancy Gilbert, Darrell
Blakney, Linda Swim, and Renee Staples

 

 

 

October 18, 2017: Hammonds Plains Historical Society

Funds will help with the oral history project, whereby seniors in the community are interviewed about past life in Hammonds Plains. The next step is to provide funding to edit the videos.

Left (from l to r): Ruby Haverstock,
Dave Haverstock, Ruth Haverstock,
Wayne Shellnutt.

October 4, 2017: SMB Lions Club

Left (from l to r): Reg Sollows, Margot Fraser,
Carlos DeCarvalho, Lydia Boutlier

 

 

 

September 27, 2017: SMB & Area Association for Community Living

Funds help with the cost of running the Life Skills program held at St. Luke’s United Church Community Hall and an Art and Exercise Program held at the Community Room at Tantallon Superstore for persons in St. Margaret’s Bay who have an intellectual disability.

 

 

September 20, 2017: SMB Food Bank

Funds are used to buy food for clients.

Left (from l to r): Pat Lade, Shirley
Conrad, Stephen Lade and Gwen
Christie.

 

 

 

September 13, 2017: Peggy’s Cove Area Festival of the Arts Society

Funds are used to support festival events; expenses include advertisements, road signs, promotional print materials, facility rentals and supplies.

Left (from l to r): Steve Belding, Sue Belding,
Daphne Trenaman, Connie Ivany.

 

 

September 6, 2017: St. Margaret Sailing Club Jr. Sail Program

Honorarium funds will go towards an overhaul of equipment and new sails.

Left (from l to r): Susan Swan, Meg Harris,
Ray Mattholie and Sarah Kirby.

 

 

August 30, 2017: 250 Vimy Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron

The group will use its $500 honorarium to support training activities.

Left (from l to r): Lisa McElman, Andy Clarke,
Julie Clarke and Judy Romans Hebb. 

 

 

August 23, 2017: SMB Lions

Honorarium funds are used to provide medical assistance equipment (wheel chairs, lift chairs, crutches) to those in need in St. Margaret’s Bay.

Left (from l to r): Peter Lund, Margot Fraser
and Reg Sollows.

 

August 16, 2017: Hubbards Heritage Society

Honorarium funds will be used to support the World Tuna Flat Races, a part of Hubbards’ heritage for 35 years. Boats are getting old; some need repairs or to be replaced.

Left (from l to r): Marsha Wilson, Greg Simms,
Darrell Blakney and Ruth Ann Blakney.

 

August 9, 2017: ONE SMB

ONE SMB is a group of St. Margaret’s Bay non-profit organizations and local small businesses collaborating to build a prosperous future for the residents of SMB. Honorarium funds will be used to assist building a SMB brand and community portal website, which will introduce local residents and visitors to events, recreational opportunities, volunteer groups and other resources and services available in the community.

 

 

 

July 19, 2017: Big Brothers Big Sisters

Honorarium funds will be used to support mentoring programs for youth, which can have a lifelong impact for not only the young people involved, but their families and communities too.

Left (from l to r): Maddy Kiesekamp, Mitchell Aguinaga,
Owen Piercey, Anne-Marie Evans.

 

 

June 7, 2017: Roots and Boots Forest School Society

Roots and Boots used their funds for outdoor programming with children in the community. They purchased supplies for making nature crafts, tools to teach skills, and healthy snacks for the Forest School recreational program—all helping to launch this not-for-profit group that connects kids to nature in St. Margaret’s Bay. Find out more about Roots and Boots online.

Left: S. Pelton and Kellie Allen accept the
$500 cheque for Roots and Boots
Forest School Society.

May 31, 2017: Hubbards and Area Business Association

Representing the Hubbards and Area Business Association (L to R): Lori Dale, Sarah Parsons, and Maureen Moore

Representing the Hubbards and Area Business Association (L to R): Lori Dale, Sarah Parsons, and Maureen Moore

The Hubbards and Area Business Association volunteer group will use their $500 honorarium for the Hubbards Community Garden beautification project, and providing free education for people seeking employment.

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May 24, 2017: Through the Years Community Centre Daycare

Representing the Through the Years Community Centre Daycare group (L to R): Mary Ellen Shatford, Dawn Coffin, Carol Coolen, and Gladys Shatford accept their Treasure Chest honorarium cheque.

Representing the Through the Years Community Centre Daycare group (L to R): Mary Ellen Shatford, Dawn Coffin, Carol Coolen, and Gladys Shatford accept their Treasure Chest honorarium cheque.

The Through the Years Community Centre Daycare group will use their $500 honorarium to purchase new bicycles and tricycles for the children to ride around in their court space.

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May 10, 2017: Three Brooks Homeowners Association

Representing the Three Brooks Homeowners Association: Beth Rogers (L), Heidi Clough (C) and Tim McClare (R) accept their Treasure Chest honorarium cheque. Three Brooks volunteer Laura Johnston also assisted.

Representing the Three Brooks Homeowners Association: Beth Rogers (L), Heidi Clough (C) and Tim McClare (R) accept their Treasure Chest honorarium cheque. Three Brooks volunteer Laura Johnston also assisted.

The Three Brooks homeowners group will use their $500 honorarium to repair and upgrade a community playground to create a natural setting for young children to explore and develop.

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April 26, 2017: SMB Lions Club

Representing the SMB Lions Club: Reg Sollows (L) and Margot Fraser accept the honorarium cheque from BTC volunteer Harry Ward (R). Lions members Lydia Boutilier and Richard Fetham also assisted.

Representing the SMB Lions Club: Reg Sollows (L) and Margot Fraser accept the honorarium cheque from BTC volunteer Harry Ward (R). Lions members Lydia Boutilier and Richard Fetham also assisted.

The Lions Club will use the $500 honorarium to support their free medical equipment lending service (e.g. crutches, hospital beds, wheelchairs, walkers, etc.) and other programs supporting local residents.

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April 14, 2017: SMB Gardening Club

Representing the SMB Gardening Club (L to R):Diane Giffin-Boudreau, Gerry Thibeau, Carole Ross, and Heather Wood

Representing the SMB Gardening Club (L to R):Diane Giffin-Boudreau, Gerry Thibeau, Carole Ross, and Heather Wood

The Gardening Club will use the $500 honorarium to buy plants and maintain the Crossroads Garden. The Gardening Club also holds garden tours and workshops in the local area.

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March 8, 2017: Bay Refugee Program

Representing the Bay Refugee Program (L to R): Shaza Zayood, Gail Kelly, and Lynn Whyte

Representing the Bay Refugee Program (L to R): Shaza Zayood, Gail Kelly, and Lynn Whyte

Funds from the $500 honorarium will go toward driving lessons for the refugee families and dental care.

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January 25, 2017: Tantallon Village Farmers Market

Tantallon Village Farmers Market represented by Cam Farnell (L) and Nora Clohossey (R).

Tantallon Village Farmers Market represented by Cam Farnell (L) and Nora Clohossey (R).

The Tantallon Village Farmers Market is a non-profit organization that will use the $500 honorarium to acquire tents, tables, signage, and other supplies as well as contributing to the insurance and fees required to operate the market. See www.TantallonVillageFarmersMarket.ca for more information.

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January 18, 2017: SMB Girl Guides

BTC Volunteer Lynn Coward (L) presenting a $500 honorarium cheque to SMB Girl Guides represented by (L to R) Marie Cron, Angie Kinley, Natalie McRae, and Holly Jean.

BTC Volunteer Lynn Coward (L) presenting a $500 honorarium cheque to SMB Girl Guides represented by (L to R) Marie Cron, Angie Kinley, Natalie McRae, and Holly Jean.

Each year St. Margaret’s Bay Girl Guides offer a district wide camp for all girls and guiders. Last year the camp was attended by 180 girls and guiders. This is a 2 night night camp, where everyone enjoys games, crafts, hiking, swimming and having fun. The approximate cost of the camp last year was $8,600 and any funds received from BTC would be used to fund this camp.

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December 28, 2016: 1st St. Margaret’s Scouters

1st St. Margaret’s Scouters represented by (L to R): Mike Smith, Catherine Higginson, Heather and George de Berdt Romilly.

1st St. Margaret’s Scouters represented by (L to R): Mike Smith, Catherine Higginson, Heather and George de Berdt Romilly.

The Scouters provide a variety of activities that help the members develop into capable, confident and well-rounded individuals that are better prepared for success in the World. Through the Scouts program the members have a lot of fun discovering new things and experiences they would not have elsewhere. The $500 honorarium will allow for the purchase of much needed equipment to undertake outings, focus on skills building, and to undertake camping trips to Scout Island (located in the Bay).

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December 21, 2016: East St. Margaret’s Elementary School Home and School Association

The Association Volunteers were represented by: (L to R) Ann Marie Griswold, Lesley Publicover, Lorie-Ann Mills, and Marg MacGrath

The Association Volunteers were represented by: (L to R) Ann Marie Griswold, Lesley Publicover, Lorie-Ann Mills, and Marg MacGrath

The $500 honorarium will be used to help bus children to after-school water safety and swimming classes to help keep children safe in their seaside community.

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December 14, 2016: Bay Chorale

The Bay Chorale was represented by: (L to R) Janice Topp, Susan Morse, Alison Bell, and Anne Connors Lorriman.

The Bay Chorale was represented by: (L to R) Janice Topp, Susan Morse, Alison Bell, and Anne Connors Lorriman.

The Bay Chorale will use the $500 honorarium to offer bursaries to any choir member who may be unable to pay choir fees, and to hire young musicians to play at the 10th anniversary concert in December.

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December 7, 2016: Bay Refugee Project

The Bay Refugee group was represented by: (L to R) Jack Lansing, Jeanne Clough, Beverly Carlsen, Najdat Barbar and Tabitha Bainbridge.

The Bay Refugee group was represented by: (L to R) Jack Lansing, Jeanne Clough, Beverly Carlsen, Najdat Barbar and Tabitha Bainbridge.

The Bay Refugee group will use their $500 honorarium to assist 6 adults from the three St. Margaret’s Bay Syrian refugee families to receive safe driver training from a licenced driver training school

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November 30, 2016: Transition Bay

Transition Bay was represented by (L to R): Anne Angus, Bob Angus, Kelly Schnare, and Robert Cervelli

Transition Bay was represented by (L to R): Anne Angus, Bob Angus, Kelly Schnare, and Robert Cervelli

Transition Bay sponsors a number of workshops throughout the year. Monies received from BTCA will be used toward the purchase of materials.

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November 23, 2016: 250 Vimy Air Cadets

The 250 Vimy Air Cadets were represented by (L to R) Colin Bond, Pamela Lovelace, Raegan Obirek, and Colleen Bennett

The 250 Vimy Air Cadets were represented by (L to R) Colin Bond, Pamela Lovelace, Raegan Obirek, and Colleen Bennett

The Vimy Air Cadets plan to use the $500 to support the activities of the 90+ cadets as a part of their leadership program. In particular to fund a workshop for senior cadets to include mentorship and instructional techniques.

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November 16, 2016: Peggy’s Cove Area Festival of the Arts

Norman Picton, Chair, Bay Treasure Chest presenting $500 cheque to Peggy's Cove Festival of the Arts represented by (L to R) Suzanne Day, Margaret Jones Callahan, Mary Lynne MacKay, and Sue George

Norman Picton, Chair, Bay Treasure Chest presenting $500 cheque to Peggy’s Cove Festival of the Arts represented by (L to R) Suzanne Day, Margaret Jones Callahan, Mary Lynne MacKay, and Sue George

The PCAFA plans to use their $500 to help support Festival events.

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November 9, 2016: St. Margaret Sailing Club Jr. Sail Program

The St Margaret Sailing Club was represented by: Front row (L to R): Megan Harris and Commodore Sarah Kirby, Back row (L to R): Peter Gregson, Hugh Roddis, and Chris Pelham

The St Margaret Sailing Club was represented by: Front row (L to R): Megan Harris and Commodore Sarah Kirby, Back row (L to R): Peter Gregson, Hugh Roddis, and Chris Pelham

The Sailing Club will use the $500 honorarium to service boats, sails, lines and dollies, etc. for their Junior Sail training programs.

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November 2, 2016: Sea Cadets

The Sea Cadets with their $500 honorarium cheque. Represented by (L to R) Daphne Demond-Rose, Joselle Barrington, Holly Jean and Mike Chiola

The Sea Cadets with their $500 honorarium cheque. Represented by (L to R) Daphne Demond-Rose, Joselle Barrington, Holly Jean and Mike Chiola

St. Margarets Bay Sea Cadets will be using the $500 honorarium to help support the cadet’s activities.

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October 26, 2016: SMB Food Bank

Norman Picton (L), Chair of Bay Treasure Chest Association presenting a $500 honorarium cheque to the SMB Food Bank represented by (L to R) Louise Sullivan, Gwen Christie, Roma Kennedy,and Donna Vienneau

Norman Picton (L), Chair of Bay Treasure Chest Association presenting a $500 honorarium cheque to the SMB Food Bank represented by (L to R) Louise Sullivan, Gwen Christie, Roma Kennedy,and Donna Vienneau

St. Margarets Bay Food Bank will be using the $500 honorarium to offset the increasing cost of food as their client numbers are continuing to rise.

(Text from a recent letter) “On behalf of the Board of Directors, staff and volunteers of the St. Margaret’s Food Bank, I wish to express our sincere thanks for the Food Bank being accepted as an applicant to the Honorarium Program of the Bay Treasure Chest Association. Enclosed is an unofficial receipt for $500.00 received in October from our first visit to the Program. We are so very grateful, as receiving cash permits us to keep the Food Bank running successfully, as well as being able to purchase food and other items which are needed but not always donated. This year we have noticed an increase in the number of clients needing assistance and such a generous monetary donation will help tremendously. Please express our thanks to all members of the Association. Yours sincerely, Gwen Christie, Secretary”

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October 19, 2016: SMB Association for Community Living

Susan Picton (L), Bay Treasure Chest Community Volunteer Coordinator, presenting cheque to the SMB Association of Community Living represented by (L to R) Pat Swim, Nancy Gilbert, Linda Swim, and Audrey Doucette.

Susan Picton (L), Bay Treasure Chest Community Volunteer Coordinator, presenting cheque to the SMB Association of Community Living represented by (L to R) Pat Swim, Nancy Gilbert, Linda Swim, and Audrey Doucette.

Bay Treasure Chest Association kicks off its Volunteer Honorarium Program with the SMB Association for Community Living!

The non-profit organization plans to use their funds to help with the cost of running life skills, dining, art, and exercise programs for persons in St. Margaret’s Bay who have an intellectual disability.

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